Stem Cell News - Science Daily

Read about today's stem cell research including novel stem cell technology and advances in understanding cancer stem cells.
  1. Factors behind embryonic stem cell state

    An international collaboration has found for the first time that two new epigenetic regulators, TAF5L and TAF6L, maintain self-renewal of embryonic stem cells. The scientists also found that these proteins activate c-Myc (a well-known cancer gene), and its regulatory network. This is the first time scientists have been able to show what these regulators do and how they control gene expression.
  2. A light-activated remote control for cells

    What if doctors had a remote control that they could use to steer a patient's own cells to a wound to speed up the healing process? Although such a device is still far from reality, researchers have taken an important first step: They used near-infrared light and an injected DNA nanodevice to guide stem cells to an injury, which helped muscle tissue regrow in mice.
  3. Boosting muscle stem cells to treat muscular dystrophy and aging muscles

    Scientists have uncovered a molecular signaling pathway involving Stat3 and Fam3a proteins that regulates how muscle stem cells decide whether to self-renew or differentiate -- an insight that could lead to muscle-boosting therapeutics for muscular dystrophies or age-related muscle decline.
  4. Scientists 'reverse engineer' brain cancer cells to find new targets for treatment

    Glioblastoma is one of the most devastating forms of cancer, with few existing treatment options. It is also a leading cause of cancer-related death in children and young adults. Scientists have 'reverse engineered' brain cancer stem cells gene by gene, uncovering multiple potential targets for this hard-to-treat cancer.
  5. How inflammation causes gastric cancer

    Researchers have solved the decades-old mystery of how stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori causes gastric cancer. Using mouse models and human cancer cell lines, they showed that inflammation resulting from bacterial infection leads to the proliferation of gastric epithelial cells, which ultimately form gastric tumors. By blocking the protein pathway responsible for this proliferation, they prevented gastric tumor formation.
  6. Discovery of 'kingpin' stem cell may help in the understanding of cancerous tumors

    Bhatia's team spent more than six years delving down to the cellular level to examine what they say are previously overlooked cells that form on the edges of pluripotent stem cell colonies. Having characterized these cells, the team also observed them form at the earliest stages of pluripotent cell reprogramming from adult cells.
  7. Shutting down deadly pediatric brain cancer at its earliest moments

    Cell-by-cell genetic analyses of developing brain tissues in neonatal mice and laboratory models of brain cancer allowed scientists to discover a molecular driver of the highly aggressive, deadly, and treatment-resistant brain cancer, glioblastoma. The findings present an opportunity to find out if new therapeutic approaches can stop glioblastoma at its earliest stages of initial formation or recurrence.
  8. Human iPSC-derived MSCs from aged individuals acquire a rejuvenation signature

    The use of primary mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is fraught with ageing-related shortfalls such as limited expansion and early senescence. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived MSCs (iMSCs) have been shown to be a useful clinically relevant source of MSCs that circumvent these agiing-associated drawbacks.
  9. Mutation stands in the way of healthy blood cell maturation

    In a new study, researchers have learned how a specific genetic mutation affects the maturation of blood cells in mouse models. Leukemia patients often have a mutation in this gene, often seen before the disease sets in. The researchers are working on a strategy for treating the mutation.
  10. Genome-wide analysis reveals new strategies to target pancreatic cancer

    An international team of scientists employed an array of next-generation sequencing and gene-editing tools, such as CRISPR, to map the molecular dependencies - and thus vulnerabilities -- of pancreatic cancer stem cells.